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Episode 17 – An Actor’s Perspective

We discuss an actor’s response to our “Working With Actors” episode

Listen now or visit iTunes to download it to your device

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Show Notes / Links

Alrik talks about his newfound interest in shooting on built sets

Timothy tells us how his commercial project was received

We read a letter from our actor friend Will. He provides insight into what it’s like to be an actor.

Modern acting training (objective / obstacle / tactic)

Shedding light on why actors are so flaky

How the film process gets in the way of being “In the Moment”

Timothy’s audition and rehearsal process from an actor’s point of view

Actors asking to watch playback

Will’s Pet Peeve: The word “settle”

A plea to use Two Cameras instead of one.

Chopping vegetables. Actors don’t always have to be comfortable.

Thanks for listening

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Published inActorsDirectingFilmmaking
  • Kellerman

    Another great episode guys! Keep ’em coming! But what was that part about a director being ONLY a director? That’s the most ridiculous thing I’ve ever heard. Quentin Tarantino’s films don’t suffer from him being the writer and director (and sometimes actor). Neither do Kevin Smith’s (arguably). Being a good director certainly doesn’t mane you’re a good writer, so I’m HOPING that’s what the author of that email meant was that being a good director does not qualify you to write your own scripts. And being a good writer does not qualify you to direct your own material.

    • Thanks Alex. I look forward to hearing from you every week now. You’re right, he was saying that just because you are a director doesn’t mean you’re qualified to write. And I’m sure that as an actor he’s frustrated because every director seems to want to be a writer/director and he’s probably wishing more directors would just direct and stop writing. I can understand that. And I agree that most directors are not writers. Even though we think we are. Me included.