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Episode 16 – Working with Producers

This week Timothy and Alrik talk about our experience working with producers and why they are so important.

Listen now or visit iTunes to download it to your device

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Show Notes / Links

 

– Timothy talks about his big commerical shoot.

– Alrik talks about submitting the work in progress cut of Brother to film festivals.

– Main topic: Producers, what do they do and all the different type of producers there are.

– Producers on commercial projects and on films.

– Why are there so many producers credited on some films?

– Wrap up and upcoming episodes.

– Listen to Timothy’s interview on Dharmic Evolution: https://soundcloud.com/dharmic-evolution/de19-timothy-plain-interview

-Thanks for listening! Leave us a review on itunes or Sticher and follow us at @mmihpodcast, @timothyplain and @alrikb. You can also find us at Making Movies is Hard on Facebook!

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Published inFilm FestivalsFilmmakingProducers
  • Kellerman

    Yet again – fully enjoyed this week’s show! I will say I lean more towards Timothy’s definition of filmmaker. While the term “filmmaker” can be broadly used for anyone who takes part in making movies, I generally use it to describe myself instead of calling myself a writer/actor/director/producer/editor. But if I want someone to hire me as a writer, I refer to myself specifically as a writer. So I guess context plays a roll. Also, Timothy, you must stop saying irregardless. It is not a word.

    • Yeah, yeah, that’s what I was kind of getting at. Filmmaker fills in for the mutliple title problem. I hate when people call themselves writer/director/producer/actor/editor. It makes me want to say “Choose one!” So filmmaker is a less annoying way to say you can do a lot of things. Do I say “irregardless”? I never noticed. Irregardless, if you understand what I’m trying to say, it’s a word.