Skip to content

Month: July 2017

Episode 112 – Make a DAMN Movie!!!

A listener challenges us to just go make our movies already! Plus we talk about how much you should get paid as a professional

Listen to this episode now or visit iTunes to download it to your device.

__________________

Make a Damn Movie!

One of our listeners writes in:

Make a damn movie! Your first movie doesn’t have to be the alternate or spirit machine or whatever, write around your limitations, to make a movie that can showcase your skills, talents, and tell a story.

Guys… I’m not gonna lie, I’m getting a little frustrated.

Tarantino didn’t start with Reservoir Dogs, he made a terrible movie called My Best Friend’s Birthday.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X6MUbRZSg80 So your first movie might be terrible, but it doesn’t mean your second movie has to be.

Make a damn movie guys! It ain’t hard.

 

Plus: How Much Should You Get Paid as a Professional?

How do you decide how much you are worth? What should you get paid when you’re first starting out? How much can you eventually make? We discuss all this and more.

Contact Us

Thanks for listening. You can find us on Twitter @timothyplain@alrikb or @mmihpodcast! And on Facebook

We want to hear from you. Tell us what you think. Leave a comment on the episode here or send us an email

And if you dig the show, please leave a review on iTunes or Stitcher

Episode 111 – Becoming “Professional”

After two years of podcasting, Alrik and Timothy finally get into details about how they became working professionals. We talk about how we got our start after graduating and the steps we took to get to where we are now. Plus we respond to the Filmmaking Sucks Podcast about what it means to be a professional.

Listen to this episode now or visit iTunes to download it to your device.

__________________

Hey, guess what? Alrik and Timothy just worked together for the second time this year. Alrik produced and Timothy directed a four day shoot. It was the biggest commercial for both of them. Keep a look out for this commercial campaign in August. We will be sending it out. We talk about the pros and cons of commercial work and whether or not we’d do it again.

Working Professional vs Hobbyist

Back in episode 104 we had listeners dial in, one of those was Lindsay Serrano, a filmmaker from New York who also has a podcast called “Filmmaking Sucks” with Manny Serrano. A few episodes ago, Lindsay and Manny talked about MMIH and we had to respond to a few things they said.

First of all, we may be professionals on paper but we don’t feel like it.  We share more in common with Lindsay and Manny than we do with anyone in Hollywood. But point taken, we do work professionally. How does that help us? How does that hurt us? We discuss how being a professional is holding us back and what it means to be a professional. We also point out how the way we work as professionals is no different than being a hobbyist.

Timothy points out that a big hurdle for us to think in microbudget terms is that the crew we have access to costs a certain rate and getting them to work for little to no money is near impossible. The math of microbudget filmmaking for us costs more because of our contacts.

But that’s not to say we can’t do it. Be sure to check out Alrik’s short “Cake” which he made with no money in a short amount of time as part of the Werner Herzog Master Class.

 

Becoming a Professional

We have two new listener reviews to share this week. One of them contains a question about how we got our start in filmmaking. We answer the question in detail. Thank you R.C. Gates for the question.

How Timothy got his start out of college

  • In 2000, Timothy graduated college and went directly to being a full time employee
  • When Timothy graduated he did not have a plan to get into filmmaking
  • After two and a half years of working for a sailboat company, Timothy found a job at Goodby Silverstein & Partners on Craiglist
  • And it wasn’t until 2005 until Timothy made his first short film out of college.
  • In 2006 he moved from facilities to the production department at Goodby Silverstein & Partners
  • For the first two years in the production department, Timothy was a one-man crew shooting, producing, editing and it wasn’t until 2009 that he got a chance to produce his first TV commercial
  • He stopped directing commercial projects between 2008-2015 and was only producing
  • In 2015 he started directing again with the Cisco spot we talked about on the podcast

This is the first commercial Timothy produced: https://vimeo.com/26651556

How Alrik got his start out of college

  • He was paying the bills with work as a bouncer and customer service at Lens Crafters
  • He gave him 3-months to get a job in filmmaking
  • Unlike Timothy, Alrik stepped directly into the world of freelancing
  • His first job was an an AD on a feature film shoot: https://youtu.be/IZdnpQO_Us4
  • Alrik went on to PA on TV and movies, including a position on Francis Ford Coppolla’s crew
  • Alrik then worked for Studio B
  • Alrik tells us about how he met the people he still works with today and how all his early opportunities led to where he is now.

Contact Us

You can find us on Twitter @timothyplain@alrikb or @mmihpodcast! And on Facebook

We want to hear from you. Tell us what you think. Leave a comment on the episode here or send us an email

And if you dig the show, please leave a review on iTunes or Stitcher

Episode 110 – “Stranger Things” Actor Jackie Dallas

Trying to get your acting career off the ground? This week we have actor Jackie Dallas on the show to talk about how she launched her career in the Bay Area and landed a role on Stranger Things. Plus, discussions on unions, finances and the challenges of being typecast. Listen to this episode now or visit iTunes to download it to your device.

__________________

Jackie Dallas is a full time actor living and working in the San Francisco Bay Area.  Here is what the internet has to say:

After going through medical school and working as a resident physician in New York and Chicago, Jackie Dallas decided to step away from her medical career to pursue her dream of acting. She started out as a background actress in random independent films and shorts before landing the role as the Yellow Ranger in a TV Pilot for a dark comedy ‘Power Rangers-like’ reboot Super Power Color Force. She then landed multiple supporting roles in Not Another Zombie Movie, City Council and starred as the lead Pamela in the dark psychological thriller Catching Broken Glass. Her recent work includes a dystopian mini-series Minutes After Midnight, a sexy short horror film Girls On The River and a supporting role in Netflix Stranger Things. Jackie has worked across the nation in cities including New York City, Miami, Chicago and now currently lives in the San Francisco Bay area of Northern California and pursues acting full time.

Switching Careers

  • You had a career in the medical field, why did you leave it behind?
  • What drove you to leave your job to become an actor.
  • What steps did you take to make it happen?

Acting in the San Francisco Bay Area

  • Why do you think getting started acting in San Francisco is better than going straight to LA?
  • How do you manage to work full time as an actor, what kinds of jobs are you getting?
  • How often do you travel for jobs?

Getting The Role on Stranger Things

  • How did you land the role on Stranger Things?
  • Was it a difficult process?
  • Do you still go on auditions for shows based in Atlanta?

Being Typecast Based On Your Ethnicity

  • What kind of struggles have you faced as a Korean-American Actor?
  • What do you do when you are asked to play towards a certain stereotype?
  • What do you think needs to happen to make a change in the industry?

Contact Jackie

If you want to get in touch with Jackie or see more of her work, check out these links below!

www.jackiedallas.com

Find Jackie on social media:

IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm6399766/

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/jackiedallas

Twitter: https://twitter.com/jaxdallas

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JackieDallasActress/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jaxdallas/

Contact Us

Thanks for listening!

You can find us on Twitter @timothyplain@alrikb or @mmihpodcast! And on Facebook

We want to hear from you. Tell us what you think. Leave a comment on the episode here or send us an email

And if you dig the show, please leave a review on iTunes or Stitcher

Episode 109 – The Business Side with Sales Rep Ben Yennie

Want to figure out how to get your movie sold, raise the funds or figure out how the movie is going to get seen? This week we have producer/sales rep Ben Yennie on the show to talk over all things film business. We start out talking about AFM, how Ben got the moniker ‘The Guerrilla Rep’ and then dive into everything business! Listen to this episode now or visit iTunes to download it to your device.

__________________

Ben Yennie is a producers/sales rep, author, entrepreneur and overall film business pro and has been working in these areas for the last 10 years.  Here is what the internet has to say:

As Founder and CEO of Guerrilla Rep Media, where I’ve gotten distribution deals for more than 8 films, that will soon be appearing on Starz and other major outlets across the globe.  Ben is also the Founder and Executive Director of Producer Foundry, as well as Producer of more than 50 events on film finance and distribution.  Hes worked with people like Lew Horowitz, the inventor of Indiefilm Gap Financing, Jeff Dowd, Exxecutive Producer of Blood Simple, Fern Gully, and inspiration for “The Dude” from the Big Lebowski. Ben co-Founded Global Film Ventures, screened business plans and advised the Film Angels and is the former chapter leader for the San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles, and Vancouver Chapters of the Institute for International Film Financing.

AFM – Should We Go?

  • Who is AFM for, who should go?
  • What should you expect out of your first AFM experience?
  • If you were in our position, would you go?
  • LOI’s, what’s the deal with these, are they even useful?

Are Films Good Investments?

  • So it’s very hard to find investors for films, why is that?
  • Are films good investments?
  • What kind of value can you expect to get out of a film investment?
  • What should film investors be thinking about when investing in film?

What Kinds of Films Should We Be Making?

  • What kinds of films are selling these days?
  • Is Horror still a top genre?
  • Is Sci-Fi still as hot as it seems?
  • What is the top selling genre right now, what movies should we be making?

Contact Ben

If you have a movie that you are looking to sell and you want Ben to be your Sales Rep, send it his way! Also check out his books on AFM, Film Marketing and much much more!

http://www.theguerrillarep.com/

If you have a movie to submit, click this link: http://www.theguerrillarep.com/submit.html

For some awesome resources check out: http://www.theguerrillarep.com/resources.html

For Ben’s books click: http://www.theguerrillarep.com/books.html

Find Steve on social media:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheGuerrillaRep
Twitter: https://twitter.com/theguerrillarep
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/theguerrillarep/

Contact Us

Thanks for listening!

You can find us on Twitter @timothyplain@alrikb or @mmihpodcast! And on Facebook

We want to hear from you. Tell us what you think. Leave a comment on the episode here or send us an email

And if you dig the show, please leave a review on iTunes or Stitcher

Episode 108 – From “Half Baked” to “Monster” with Steven Bernstein

For years, Steven Bernstein was the go-to DP for big budget comedies like Half Baked, The Waterboy, and White Chicks. Then he shot ‘Monster’ with Patty Jenkins which inspired him to get back into writing and directing his own films. Listen to this episode now or visit iTunes to download it to your device.

__________________

Steven Bernstein is a writer, director and cinematographer, best known for his work as DP on a huge range of films. After years of being the go-to guy for comedies, Steve finally opted for a change and was hired to shoot ‘Monster’ for Patty Jenkins which inspired him to pursue his own passion as a writer and director. His feature film debut as director is ‘Decoding Annie Parker.’

Career Beginnings

It’s immediately clear when talking to Steve that big budget comedies are not a natural fit. So why exactly did Steve spend so much of his career shooting broad comedies?

When you first start out you assume you can jump backwards and forward but what happens is you become known for doing something well and you become a safe pair of hands. So much of your early career, he says, is based on arbitrary decisions you make.

After years and years of big budget comedies, how did Steve break the cycle and shoot ‘Monster’? It all started while Steve was shooting 2nd Unit Action on S.W.A.T. and thought “I have everything I’ve ever wanted, but I’m not happy.” He says he wanted to jump off the 3rd Street bridge. With the permission of the producers, he left the film and was hired to shoot ‘Monster.’

Bottom line is that as a filmmaker we often have to choose between passion and money. If you only follow one, the other gets pushed to the wayside. On top of that, making the right decision is even harder to do when 9 out of 10 people are lying to you. Alrik asks how we navigate our careers knowing that people may be lying to us.

Should We All Move to Los Angeles?

What’s Steve’s opinion on living in LA to pursue a career in film vs living somewhere else? He says the important thing to have is a production team around you. And if you care about films you need creative stimulation that are oblique and the problem is that everyone in Los Angeles shares the same stimuli. Having said that, you have to weigh the pros of being in Los Angeles like access to a lot of actors and crews, giving you options and allowing you to find the best person for your project.

Getting Name Actors In Your Films

One of the problems Alrik and I have is reaching name actors for our films but Steve says it’s easy: write something good and important. Actors want to be in good films and prove their skills as an artist so if you have great material, actors will say yes.

Sure, but we don’t have an agent or manager, how do we do it once we have that great script? Steve says the key is to get your funding first, then hire a casting director to reach out and book actors.

Lessons from an Experienced DP, Writer and Director

Steve shares some of the lessons he learned from shooting movies including “The atmosphere you engender on set invariably ends up on screen” This works for both comedies and dramas. Timothy asks about working on a comedy set and if things are funny during the shoot, do they translate to comedy in the finished piece? Steve says that in his experience, no, and the same goes for drama. If an actor gives an impassioned performance and the director is crying and the script supervisor is crying, then it’s probably too big, so you have to distance yourself from the situation and evaluate a performance in context of all the pieces.

And we spend a little time talking about what makes for good comedy and for good stories. It boils down to one word: Truth

Steve’s Financing Model

Then we get back to Steve’s model for getting a film made with the actors you want. Traditional fundraising models are contingent on getting the right actor. Steve’s model disregards the actor and secures the money first. Get the money so when you contact agents you can say you have the money and a shoot date. A real offer means actors will read your script and take it seriously, and they would rather work on good material for a little money than not be working at all.

But Wait, How Do You Get Money Without Actors?

You need to convince investors that if you try and secure actors now, you will pay too much. Steve told his investors, that by getting the money first and approaching actors after the funds are raised and shoot dates are set, the movie will get the actors they want, and not just the actors you need. It puts the investors in a position of power. It flips the model. Investors come in on a the movie with a list of actors you want to get and you tell them that with their money you will go to a casting director and access people on this list. The money goes into an ESCROW account and will only be released if you secure one of the actors on that list.

The best thing about this model, he says, is that the investors are not risking any money at all until you secure an actor from the list they agreed to. But it works better than the traditional model because with money you now have negotiating power.

So you get a name actor, will they come prepared? Will they put the work in? What can we expect?

We talk characters vs outlines and the danger of outlining your screenplay.

It’s also important to have a script you believe in and have a vision for. You need to be able to communicate that vision.

 

Contact Steve

If you like what Steve has to say, try one of his on-line seminars. He’s currently offering seminars in screenwriting, directing, cinematography and more. Check out his website for more info: https://www.somebodystudios.com/seminars

Or check out his feature film “Decoding Annie Parker”

Find Steve on social media:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StevenBernsteinOfficial/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/stevebfilm
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/StevenBernsteinDirectorWriter/

Contact Us

Thanks for listening!

You can find us on Twitter @timothyplain@alrikb or @mmihpodcast! And on Facebook

We want to hear from you. Tell us what you think. Leave a comment on the episode here or send us an email

And if you dig the show, please leave a review on iTunes or Stitcher